Album Reviews

Anderson .Paak – Malibu

                                                                              Parking Lot

Later with Jools Holland brought me to Anderson .Paak (& the Free Nationals, his accompanying live band) who I saw play on the show and they were tremendous, the mix of R n’ B, funk, neo-soul with a splash of hip hop caught my ear and more so as they are genres I have not listed to too much it exited me. My interest was piqued I naturally went and checked out his music on the interwebs.

Malibu was the album he was touring and the 4th of his career.  Checking it out was certainly the correct thing to do as it would have been a real shame if it had passed me by. Curiosity in this case didn’t kill the cat.

The album is smooth throughout from the opening The Bird which is more in the jazzy soul camp to the more R n’ B one like Carry Me the flow on the split song The Season/Carry Me is really interesting with .Paak showing one of the many aspects to his voice. The Season has one of the most memorable lyrics fro me in it ‘And fuck fame, that killed all my favourite entertainers’.  

Parking Lot is addictive the chorus is so darn catchy helped by the clapping that hooks you, oh and the pronounced bass on it is great also (rivalled a number of times admittedly by The Waters featuring BJ the Chicago Kid and Come Down man what a funky tune that is). I have linked it below the picture for a reason after all.

It gets all seductive on Room in Here which features The Game and Sonyae Elise (two of many great features from artists and musicians on Malibu) with  a simple backing beat and piano there isn’t much going on but it is still class and the playfulness side .Paak shows is more than enough to push the track forward. Playfulness also rears its head on track six Am I Wrong  a lyric to show this is ‘A I wrong to assume, If she can’t dance, then she can’t oow’ plus those horns.  

Make sure that you don’t let this quality collection of tracks go by without you listening to it, I promise that there is something for everyone. Be it if you are into soul, R n’ B and hip hop or not. It is does have its flaws though as some songs could have been cut to make the overall package more concentrated and tighter.

The cover of Malibu really does say a lot about this album in the fact that there is a lot of things going on, however at the focus is Anderson .Paak. Who is beyond brilliant merging all that busyness into a cohesive and explorative sound.      

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Album Reviews

WHITE- One Night Stand Forever (Album)

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                                                                                       WHITE One Night Stand Forever

Reinvigorating music again.

WHITE’s (Lewis Andrew, Leo Condie, Hamish Fingland, Kirstin Lynn and Chris Potter) first album is a much welcomed revival of arty, slightly twisted merging of electro with groovy dirty rock and a bit of the dramatic.

Fittingly the opener is Living Fiction (the bands first ever single) is a great opener and introduction to the band as it is upbeat and hip with many elements one will certainly grab hold of you and make you move.

This Is Not A Love Song? is not a song to get you jigging but it still fits in with all the other tracks, having a darker tone thanks to the ‘Duh-du-duuuu’s (it’s better on the record), a slower tempo pushed forward by an acoustic guitar whilst a noticeable electronic (of some kind) plays in the left speaker/head/earphone that really is a nice addition to the track. Directly following this is the super energetic Be The Unknown which has poppy ‘oooo’s to bop to plus a heavily distorted guitar solo to boot reinforcing the bands talents plus their willingness to merge genres to great effect.

The string of songs from One Night Stand Forever to Sweat (a thumping monstrous full on electro track that I didn’t see coming) and How Can You Get Love So Wrong? (a modern 1980s-esc ballad) together can tell a story of a quick one night fling gone in a direction that is a bit more than a one night stand. But that would be oversimplifying the meanings behind them. Especially How Can You Get Love So Wrong? as it was written back in 2014,

‘I wrote this in 2014 when Scotland was under a constant barrage of ‘lovebombs’ from the British government, in that peculiarly sado-masochistic manner so beloved, apparently, of the Conservatives. Tough love, I guess. I was fascinated by their ineptness so this is, in part, for them. With all my love.’

Leo Conti explained in a track by track interview with The List’s Kirstyn Smith.

Sound wise these three tracks could be the perfect ones to show the diversity that rings trough this record. It is more diverse than most other bands have in three or four outings. Though I do feel a little wrong in singling out these songs as they are all outstanding, everyone is distinct, stylish, hitting you right in the dance initiation drive that may have been dormant for a while or last night. Quick bit about Hit,Hit, Hit is so good I appreciate the aggression in this one.

One Night Stan Forever is the most creative album to come around in a long, long time. If you don’t at least check it out then believe me that is a hell of a mistake. Don’t let this pass you by a band like this don’t come around to often.

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